"" Ralph W. Moss, Ph.D., Cancer Advisor: A visit to Colin Campbell

Monday, November 1, 2010

A visit to Colin Campbell



On Friday I drove to Ithaca, NY, to hear a lecture by T. Colin Campbell, PhD, the retired Cornell University professor and author of The China Study. Afterwards we had dinner at his house overlooking Lake Cayuga. I am investigating his theory that a low-fat vegan diet is highly protective against cancer. I am particularly interested in his findings on milk/dairy and cancer incidence. To be sure, I haven't made up my mind on this yet. But I certainly admire the man for his commitment to improving the health of humanity. During his lecture he played a film clip of President Clinton being interviewed recently by Wolf Blitzer of CNN. In it, Clinton pays homage to Campbell and credits him and his colleagues with not only his weight loss but also with greatly improved health. It was impressive.

10 comments:

  1. It's worth considering Peter D'Adamo's body of research on blood type and diet interactions too. The effects of a vegan diet may well vary by genotype, from harmful to beneficial. One size fits all models are risky.

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  2. I read the China study years ago. The main message I draw is not to not eat animal protein but to eat less than 5% of our calories in this form. A wonderful book called Catching Fire describes 2m years of cooking and eating. It establishes that our species is not a vegan species. If it was not our consumption of omega 3 rich fish from the second deepest lake sited in the rift valley 190,000 years ago (omitted from the book) it is unlikely our brains would have evolved beyond that of home erectus.

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  3. Nora Gedgaudas, CN addresses Campbell's research in her new book "Primal Body - Primal Mind." To me her book offers the clearest insight into what our body needs to remain vibrant and disease free I've seen to date.

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  4. Blood type diets seem well worth considering. I wonder if there are any studies on this subject.

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  5. Since reading the China Study last year and also studying Dr. Moss's compilation of data on my cancer type, I don't think I could have been guided better by two great thinkers, analysts, or researchers than you both. Great you are getting together somewhere besides in my brain. Would love to hear more on Dr. Campbell's statements that supplements are unresearched. I agree with him after reading the China Study and am not taking any. I appreciate also Dr. Moss's suggestion I go to Dr. Block's clinic in Evanston to find an oncologist on the leading edge. Thank you for being willing to take the heat from the establishment so we could benefit and make choices for life with science to back us up. I cried through many of the chapters in the China Study--so amazing that we could be ignorant and injuring children and others with our brainwashing. I now see life as a simple and beautiful array of healing everywhere, in every vegetable and fruit, in the sunshine and clean water, in fresh air and friendship.

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  6. Dr Moss - Having read both Campbell's book and the criticism of his research interpretations I would be most grateful to read your findings on this as I am still unsure on this issue - I look forward to your comments.

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  7. WHAT RESEARCH? There are no references in D’Adamo’s book siting scientific studies on his premise that different blood types need different diets. This is a nice theory, and could be a powerful guideline for some to make positive changes, but testimonials are not scientific studies that prove anything.

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  8. Are you folks aware of the work of Prof Jane Plant, a survivor of multiple occurrences of breast cancer, who views the avoidance of dairy products as the key factor in her survival? Her book, Your Life in Your Hands, is written in a style that mixes her personal story with more scientific observations. I find it a bit irritating, but it probably adapts the book better to its target market. From memory, it came out in the UK early in this century, and there are subsequent follow-ups that I have not had the opportunity to read. I note that it's available on Amazon.com in North America.

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  9. Wishing you the best in your investigation into the relationship between eating plant-based WHOLE foods (I suppose a vegan could be someone living on potato chips and coke) and disease. This is not an easy undertaking. First, it is easy for researchers to skew or interpret data to favor their or their financial backers interests. And second, it is natural to favor information that supports the views we hold at any given time in life, especially if they happen to favor our own bad habits. Good luck!

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  10. I am eager to see your research review on the effects of vegan vs carnivorous diets. I followed a vegan diet for two years during chemo after reading The China Study. Then I read Denise Menger's critique which seems believable and discredited Campbell's analysis. I also find Gary Taube's review of nutrition literature in Good Calories Bad Calories believable. He does not find meat to contribute to cancer. Sandra Bender

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